Calculation

Non-certified translations

We charge translations on the basis of so-called standard lines. One standard line includes 55 characters plus spaces of the finished translation. The total number is calculated on the basis of the information provided by MSWord and is then multiplied by a specific language-dependent price per line. This provides the final price for the translation.

This volume-based pricing model is the fairest option for both customers as well as translators.

Upon request we also offer flat rates. Here the source text must be provided in MSWord and customers should be aware that they might end up paying far more than they would have paid with the volume-based approach.
Minimum rates apply for short translations as every job occasions certain overhead costs that need to be covered even for very short texts.

Certified translations

Certified translations require extra bit of care which is also reflected in the price. We generally charge a minimum rate covering certification plus a translation equalling the length of a simple document (e.g. an Austrian birth certificate). Any lines beyond this volume will be charged extra at a language-dependent price.

Proofreading, voice-overs, visits to embassies to obtain your attestations, transcripts etc. will be charged extra at an agreed hourly rate plus possible cash expenditures.

Our rates do not include VAT which will be added on top at 20%.

What exactly is in the price?

Even though translations are charged by standard line, the price covers much more than might be visible at first glance.
As soon as you commission your translation you set off an entire machinery geared towards getting your message across perfectly to the target language:

  1. Our project management team records and analyses the job and places it with the best-suited translator.
  2. The translator produces the translation after which it is passed on to a corrector.
  3. The proofreader proofs the translation which is then forwarded to an editor.
  4. The editor performs a final revision and gives the all-clear.
  5. Your translation is then delivered to you and archived according to your wishes.

Invoicing, bank charges, and accountant costs as well as telecom services further add to the bill to make sure that your message is understood around the globe and in every detail. Once you consider how much in involved, we are sure you will agree that translations by ad hoc are a true bargain!

How is it possible that you keep getting super cheap offers online at just a fraction of the price?

The translation industry is a non-regulated market and the internet a true jungle where many a soldier of fortune is trying to make a quick buck. As you have seen above, good translations are the products of meticulous, elaborate processes not to be had for next to nothing. Providers offering very low prices usually have a good reason for doing so. Many produce translations using google translate & co. and get them back to the clients without revising them even once.

Many professionally looking provider websites are gone again within weeks, but not before having caused major harm to both customers and translators. Invoices are frequently issued with fake company details, payment is demanded via paypal and other internet payment services that make it easy to conceal identities, client data gets stolen, etc. As a customer you might get a bitter wake-up call at your next tax review if invoices with fake data are detected in your accounts and you need to prove that you did not know anything about it.

Translator scammers have meanwhile become such a big nuisance that numerous specific websites are warning against their practices and providing information about possible as well as very real harm already caused by them. If you are interested in further reading we are happy to recommend e.g. ww.translator-scammers.com, twitter.com/tsdirectory, www.translationrules.com/3-types-of-translation-scams-and-how-. and any more.